FocusQuest

Categories
For Students News

Creating Safe Spaces for Black Students – Dr. Lauren Mims

Creating Safe Spaces for Black Students - Dr. Lauren Mims

For Dr. Lauren Christine Mims, few challenges are more important in public education than creating spaces for Black students to flourish and thrive.

“I’m less interested in preparing Black children for this world if we are not also preparing the world for the Black children,” says Mims, assistant professor of applied psychology at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University.

For Mims, that means dismantling biased systems that stereotype Black students as behavioral problems rather than recognize their resilience in the face of racism and tap into their innate brilliance.

Mims says the work is particularly crucial for Black girls, who are at the heart of her research agenda.

Colleagues and students hail Mims for shifting the focus away from viewing Black students, parents, and families through a deficit lens.

 

“Her groundbreaking work in the field of psychology is reshaping the narrative by highlighting the strengths and daily experiences of Black families and bringing a much-needed focus to the experiences of Black girls,” says Elisha Arnold, who has Mims as her graduate advisor at NYU.

Natalie H. Brito, an associate professor of applied psychology, also at NYU, shared similar observations.

“Dr. Mims is pushing the field to conceptualize Black homes as a conduit for positive growth, learning, and development by acknowledging the unique skill set and contributions Black parents provide to ensure that their children learn and thrive,” Brito says.

Much of the language that Mims uses in her research is about liberation for Black students. She espouses creative problem solving in what she refers to as “fugitive spaces,” where students discuss systems of oppression – and community strengths – as a part of the creative process.

She says the goal of her research is to help Black students to “freedom dream,” a term inspired by Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination, a 2002 book by Dr. Robin D.G. Kelley, Distinguished Professor and Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History at UCLA.

 

To get a sense of what freedom dreaming looks like in action, consider a recent visit Mims made to a middle school in Richmond, Virginia, as part of “Freedom Dreaming and Dreamkeeping with Black Girls,” a course she developed for Black middle school girls with a small grant from NYU.

“I gave them a big, huge piece of white butcher paper that goes across the table, and they just wrote all of the dreams that they had,” Mims recounts. “They wanted mental health professionals and counselors that were Black and understood what it meant to be Black. They wanted teachers to talk about Black joy in the classroom and not just Black pain or slavery. They wanted spaces where they could just see themselves and just laugh and be joyful during the school day.”

The freedom dreaming that Mims does with students began in Fairfax, Virginia, where she grew up as the daughter of a librarian mother and a lawyer father. One of her fondest memories is of getting books from the library with her family and then discussing them in the living room.

“I was able to dream out loud,” Mims recalls. “And I think these spaces that allow children to dream out loud, they’re just so important.”

Mims attributes much of her career success to the late Elijah Cummings, the longtime U.S. Congressman from Maryland. Specifically, it was a 2013 keynote speech that Cummings gave for the Black Policy Conference held at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics. Mims was working on her master’s degree in child development at Tufts University at the time.

“He said wherever you are, you need to be the best,” Mims recalls. That philosophy, Mims says, enabled her to go from being an intern within the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans during the Obama Administration to becoming assistant director of the initiative.

 

“I wanted to be the best intern I could be,” Mims says, explaining how, when she wrote a policy memo, she would include talking points. She would also look at the director’s calendar and assign herself work to support upcoming events.

“For me it was really trying to be the best in that role,” Mims says. She knew the work paid off, she says, when others began to say: “You are an invaluable member of the team.” 

 

#BlackEducation #InclusiveSpaces #Growth #Diverse #Learning #Education #Equity #Empowering #Communities #BlackExcellence #CreativeProblemSolving #EducationForAll #DreamBig #EducationalEquality

Share on Social Media

facts corner

Featured Articles

medium-shot-man-traveling-by-train_52683-124722
Creating Safe Spaces for Black Students - Dr. Lauren Mims
Creating Safe Spaces for Black Students – Dr. Lauren Mims For Dr. Lauren Christine Mims, few challenges...
Read More
image-2024-01-22T140701
Here’s how AI is driving equity in Higher Education
Here’s how AI is driving equity in Higher Education In the pursuit of creating a level playing field...
Read More
Categories
News Student Succes Coaching

Greetings, Illustrious Scholars! (And yes, that means you!)

Dear Students,

As Student Success Coaches, we would like to take this opportunity to reach out and communicate with you directly. We understand that your academic journey can be challenging, but please know that we are here to support you every step of the way.

We want to remind you that your success is our top priority. We are here to provide you with guidance, resources, and support to help you achieve your academic goals. Whether you need assistance with time management, study skills, or navigating the university, we are here to help.

It is important to remember that you are not alone in this journey. For this reason we have created this entry to provide you with a direct message and to be able to contact us more directly. We hope you enjoy.

Student Success Coaches

Greetings, Illustrious Scholars! (And yes, that means you!)

Share on Social Media

I don’t know about you, but January seemed to Zoom by for me. Now, as we dive into February, a month celebrating both Black history and love, I’m ready to kick things off with a dual challenge for each of you.

First challenge? Strive for excellence. In our pursuit of greatness, we pay homage to the melanated scholars who paved the way for equal educational rights. We’re standing on the shoulders of trailblazers like Mary McLeod Bethune, a total powerhouse from back in the day. Born in 1875, she was all about education, civil rights, and breaking barriers. Imagine her fighting for the freedom to learn and founding the Daytona Educational and Industrial Training School for Negro Girls in 1904 – the roots of Bethune-Cookman University. Now, that’s a legacy worth honoring. Let’s channel that energy into reaching new heights in our own educational journeys.

Seek help when needed. Whether it’s tackling a tricky assignment or needing some advice, don’t hesitate to reach out. You are building your future, so every assignment is a building block, and every class is a stepping stone.

Now, onto the second challenge, and this one may be harder than the first. Strive to be kind. Extend kindness not only to those close to you but to everyone who crosses your path. It gets easier to be kind when we suspend judgment. In the wise words of Ted Lasso, “Be curious, not judgmental.” Often, we think we objectively understand others, but in reality, our knowledge is limited. This month let’s make our forefathers proud. Be curious, ask questions instead of passing judgments, and choose kindness above all. Remember, you’re not only scholars but contributors to a culture of understanding and compassion. Choose to be kind. It has the power to transform our environment and uplift those around us.

Wishing you all an inspiring and fulfilling month of growth, curiosity, and kindness. Strive for excellence, stay focused, and embrace the spirit of love and learning.

Ndala M. Booker, Ed.D.

Chief Student Success Officer

More entries

Categories
For Students News

Here’s how AI is driving equity in Higher Education

Here’s how AI is driving equity in Higher Education

In the pursuit of creating a level playing field in education, Dr. Vistasp Karbhari, a Complete College America Fellow and a member of UT Arlington’s team, alongside leaders like Audrey Ellis, the founder of T3 Advisory, have spearheaded initiatives to promote fairness. Central to their efforts is the development of an AI playbook and a comprehensive paper dedicated to fairness in education. Their collaboration with Complete College America has been instrumental in making these endeavours possible.

The Ideation of Equity in Education

In this paper on fairness, Dr. Vistasp Karbhari and Audrey Ellis introduce a groundbreaking concept: The Complete College America Council on Equitable AI in Higher Education. The council aims to amplify the voices of individuals from diverse backgrounds in education, particularly those often overlooked in discussions about policies, products, and funding for post-secondary education. Their vision includes forging partnerships with major tech companies to ensure that educational institutions, which typically miss out on opportunities when new technologies emerge, are granted equitable access.

The AI playbook translates their vision into immediate action. It offers colleges and universities invaluable insights and practical applications for harnessing the power of AI to enhance college opportunities and boost completion rates. The playbook delineates actionable steps in three critical areas: organizational effectiveness, teaching and learning, and the student experience. It also provides user-friendly prompts for leveraging dynamic AI chatbot technology.

Bridging the Access Gap

The core objective is to empower institutions to transform AI solutions into reality, both in the present and the future. Dr. Vistasp Karbhari emphasizes the critical need for all educational institutions to have access to the right technology, expertise, and financial resources required to effectively implement dynamic AI. This concerted effort is aimed at maximizing the potential of these tools and addressing disparities in access and achievement.

Audrey Ellis underscores the practicality of the playbook and equity paper, equipping higher education professionals with tangible tools to accelerate equity and graduation rates within their institutions. Through the judicious implementation of AI, colleges and faculties can revolutionize their establishments and elevate the academic journey of their students.

Complete College America, known for its forward-thinking approach, introduced the CCA Tech Approval Seal in 2016. This initiative acknowledges unique software solutions that bolster Game Changer tactics for student success and graduation.

AI’s Transformative Role in Higher Education

In an ever-evolving landscape of higher education, AI tools have emerged as indispensable assets. They enable educational institutions to leverage technology for inclusivity, equal opportunity provision, and enhanced student success. The collaborative efforts behind the playbook and equity paper signal a commitment to harness the potential of AI to drive holistic improvements in higher education.

In conclusion, Dr. Vistasp Karbhari, Audrey Ellis, and Complete College America have embarked on a journey to reshape the future of education by promoting fairness and inclusivity through AI. Their work is not only visionary but also equipped with practical tools and strategies to catalyze positive change in higher education.

 

#FocusQuest #EquitableEducation #AI #Education #HigherEdInnovation #Tech #DiverseVoices #StudentSuccess #TransformativeAI #Inclusive #Future #Equality

Share on Social Media

facts corner

Featured Articles

Untitled design - 1
The Divine Nine: History of Black Sororities and Fraternities
The Divine Nine: History of Black Sororities and Fraternities Black Greek-letter organizations have made...
Read More
fulbright-hbcu-2023-1536x864
These Schools Named 'Fulbright HBCU Institutional Leaders' by U.S. State Department
These Schools Named ‘Fulbright HBCU Institutional Leaders’ by U.S. State Department The U.S....
Read More
Categories
For Students News

The Divine Nine: History of Black Sororities and Fraternities

The Divine Nine: History of Black Sororities and Fraternities

Black Greek-letter organizations have made a deep impact on Black American culture. Learn more about the fraternities and sororities that started it all.

The Divine Nine is the nickname of a group of nine historically Black Greek-letter organizations called the National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC). These nine organizations have a significant place in Black American history and culture. Collectively, these organizations comprise nearly 4 million members. These organizations are a source of family and community to many Black students, with some first-generation members and others joining as a legacy.

The Divine Nine organizations have been around since the early 1900s and have contributed greatly to Black American culture. They are committed to public service, scholarship and brother- and sisterhood. These traditions have trickled down through generations of members and even infiltrated pop culture. The Divine Nine’s impact on Black American life and culture is apparent.

Which Greek-Letter Organizations Are Part of the Divine Nine?

The Divine Nine comprises nine organizations in total, each with a different purpose and attributes. Here is a short breakdown of each.

  • Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.: With the aim of manly deeds, scholarship, and love for all mankind, Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity is the first intercollegiate Greek-letter organization founded for Black men in the United States. Seven students at Cornell University started the organization on December 4, 1906. It started out as a study group.
  • Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.: Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, whose members are also known as the Ivies, is the oldest established Greek-letter organization for Black women. The organization started at Howard University on January 15, 1908. They aim to be of service to all mankind.
  • Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.: This organization focuses deeply on community service, with special emphasis on serving the Black community. Delta Sigma Theta, founded on January 13, 1913, at Howard University, aims to provide assistance and support through established programs in local communities throughout the world.
  • Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.: Also known as the Nupes, Kappa Alpha Psi has been dedicated to brotherhood and service in the Black community since its founding on January 5, 1911, at Indiana University Bloomington. It has two names, the other being Phi Nu Pi. The fraternity’s motto is Achievement in Every Field of Human Endeavor.
  • Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.: Founded on November 17, 1911, at Howard University, this organization is based on four principles: Manhood, Scholarship, Perseverance, and Uplift. Omega Psi Phi aims to elevate its members and the Black community.
  • Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.: The only NPHC member fraternity with a constitutionally-bound sister Greek-letter organization — Zeta Phi Beta — Phi Beta Sigma‘ was established on January 9, 1914, at Howard University. Its mission focuses on community service, building brotherhood, and promoting scholarship.
  • Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.: The sister organization to Phi Beta Sigma, Zeta Phi Beta sorority’s ideals include Scholarship, Service, Sisterhood and Finer Womanhood. Zeta Phi Beta, founded on January 16, 1920, at Howard University, prides itself on achieving a legacy of excellence.
  • Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.: Sigma Gamma Rho is the only Black sorority founded at a predominantly white institution, Butler University in Indiana. Founded on November 12, 1922, its mission is to better women’s lives through community service, civil, and social action.
  • Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Inc.: Founded during the Civil Rights movement on September 19, 1963, at Morgan State University, Iota Phi Theta fraternity was the last member admitted to the NPHC. They have a long history of social service. The organization is dedicated to making meaningful contributions to society, with special emphasis on doing so in the Black community.
The History of the Divine Nine

Now known nationally and internationally, the Divine Nine have a long and rich history cultivated over decades of growth.

Initially, fraternities in the United States, like the institutions of higher learning in which they were founded, were exclusively for white male students. Women created sororities in response to the fraternities’ refusal to admit them. Subsequently, when Black students began to enroll in universities, they faced the same issue. So, they created the first Black Greek-letter organizations in response to the racism Black students experienced on campuses.

After the establishment and popularization of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the United States, Black fraternities and sororities followed. The organizations began out of fellowship and shared principles rather than as a direct response to racist beliefs and practices. Howard University, in particular, was the founding site for five of the Divine Nine. These organizations quickly spread to other universities in the coming decades, including at primarily white institutions (PWIs).

Black Greek Organizations Formed the NPHC

Howard University students founded the National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) — not to be confused with the National Panhellenic Conference — in 1930 to spark unity and protect the members’ collective interests.

Though some members of NPHC were at HBCUs, others were not and needed a place to ensure their institutions would treat them fairly. The council’s formation ensured that members would have a say on their respective campuses.

The Divine Nine’s Civil Rights Legacy

Black Greek-letter organizations like the Divine Nine have been historically significant for many reasons, including involvement in the Black Arts movement, the Civil Rights movement, the Black Power movement, and most recently, Black Lives Matter. As organizations committed to serving the Black community, these organizations’ missions easily fell in line with the movements’ missions.

Many members of Divine Nine organizations were pivotal figures in the Civil Rights movement, including but not limited to:

Chapters themselves were also important to the movement, as they formed connections with organizations like the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC).

What the Divine Nine Does Today

Today, the Divine Nine is still deeply committed to the Black community. The organizations have not forgotten their history as changemakers and are still dedicated to service, empowerment, and fellowship.

Members of NPHC called for racial justice in 2020, specifically in response to George Floyd’s killing. Individual chapters and members have also demonstrated in support of the message behind the Black Lives Matter movement.

Both collegiate and alum members of the Divine Nine organizations participate in philanthropic efforts — from heart disease awareness to denouncing sexual assault — with the specific cause varying from chapter to chapter. They are all also very involved in voter rights activism.

The Divine Nine at HBCUs

At HBCUs, the Divine Nine are usually intertwined with the history of the schools. They are involved in campus-wide events and are recognized and celebrated by faculty and staff. HBCUs feature Greek life organizations like the Divine Nine at athletic eventsprofessional affairs, and the HBCU homecoming experience — which is much more than just a football game for many HBCUs.

Additionally, members of the Divine Nine understand the powerful network of members, both collegiate and alumni, that come along with joining these organizations. With more people interested in joining HBCUs, those networks become much stronger.

The Divine Nine at PWIs

At PWIs, Divine Nine organizations may be less involved in school-sponsored activities and events, but they are no less committed to their missions. These groups often become hubs for Black and other minority students interested in the principles of Divine Nine organizations.

Additionally, Divine Nine members at PWIs are often leaders of social activism on their campuses. They also tend to be involved with other organizations across campus. Divine Nine fraternities and sororities at PWIs tend to be smaller in number and very tight-knit, with members who are devoted to their new-found families.

 #DivineNine #BlackExcellence #CulturalLegacy #Sororities #Fraternities #NPHC #HBCUs #HBCU #FocusQuest

Share on Social Media

facts corner

Featured Articles

1688375342902
HBCUs’ Impact on Diversity in Healthcare Workers
HBCUs’ Impact on Diversity in Healthcare Workers As a hopeful sign of change, recent trends show that...
Read More
young-depressed-adult-home
How to Get Past Imposter Syndrome in Your Career Journey
How to Get Past Imposter Syndrome in Your Career Journey Embarking on a new educational path can often...
Read More
Categories
News Student Succes Coaching

Welcome 2024

Dear Students,

As Student Success Coaches, we would like to take this opportunity to reach out and communicate with you directly. We understand that your academic journey can be challenging, but please know that we are here to support you every step of the way.

We want to remind you that your success is our top priority. We are here to provide you with guidance, resources, and support to help you achieve your academic goals. Whether you need assistance with time management, study skills, or navigating the university, we are here to help.

It is important to remember that you are not alone in this journey. For this reason we have created this entry to provide you with a direct message and to be able to contact us more directly. We hope you enjoy.

Student Success Coaches

Welcome 2024

Share on Social Media

Happy 2024 to all of you fantastic students of all kinds and every level – high schoolers, undergrads, grads, and certificate achievers! Welcome to a brand-new year filled with exciting possibilities!

As you dive into 2024, remember this: success is a journey, not a destination. It won’t always be a cakewalk, but oh, the adventure is so worth it! Think about it – no epic story started with, “Once upon a time, everything was easy.”

Persistence is your secret sauce! When the going gets tough (and it will), keep pushing forward. Trust me; the view from the top is way more spectacular when you’ve conquered some hurdles.

Now, let’s chat mindset and academic attitude. Be aware of them like your favorite Netflix show updates! Recognize any habits that might be dragging you down. Are you a midnight crammer or a procrastination pro? Identifying these quirks is your first step to supercharging your success.

As you embark on this academic adventure, don’t forget to sprinkle some fun, happiness, and peace into the mix. Life’s too short for all work and no play! Make friends, explore new interests, and savor every success, big or small.

Here’s to a year filled with growth, laughter, and discovering your awesome potential. You’ve got this! Cheers to your success and the countless adventures that lie ahead!

Ndala M. Booker, Ed.D.

Chief Student Success Officer

More entries

Categories
For Students News Student Succes Coaching

Massasoit Community College Launches New Black Studies Major

Massasoit Community College Launches New Black Studies Major

In a pioneering move, Massasoit Community College, located in Massachusetts, has become the first two-year school in the state to offer a degree program in Black Studies. This initiative aims to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the Black experience through courses such as “Sociology of Race and Ethnicity” and “Contemporary Issues in the Black Community.”

The Decade-Long Journey

The roots of this groundbreaking program trace back a decade when student feedback highlighted the need for a more culturally diverse curriculum. “In 2020, as interest grew and Black student enrollment increased, Sauvignon crafted a Black Studies curriculum and submitted it to the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education. The program got approval last spring.”

Dr. Sauvignon emphasizes that the program goes beyond catering solely to Black students. It serves as a platform for students from all backgrounds to gain insights into the Black experience, fostering understanding and appreciation of diverse cultures. “It’s a good place in time right now, where critical race theory is being embraced, where understanding and appreciating cultures is being embraced, with racial equity and DEI initiatives being embraced.”

Shaping Future Perspectives

Renowned sociologist Dr. Elijah Anderson stresses the importance of understanding Black Studies as a reflection of American history. This innovative program is designed not only to empower Black students but also to enlighten students of all backgrounds about different cultural experiences. Dr. Shawn Utsey, professor of psychology, emphasizes how exposure to the Black narrative can reduce biases, particularly among those in law enforcement. “If we can expose them to let them know that Black folks are just different sometimes – there’s not anything to be afraid of – people would perhaps be less alarmed in the presence of Black people, and we will reduce the many, many mishaps that occur.”

Beyond Academia

The interdisciplinary approach of Massasoit’s Black Studies courses ensures that the knowledge gained isn’t confined to a singular academic pursuit. Credits from these courses count toward liberal arts and humanities elective requirements across various degrees and facilitate smooth credit transfers to four-year colleges. “The goal is to provide the foundation for Black students to understand who they are, where they come from, and where they can go. For non-Black students, it’s an opportunity to learn about different cultural experiences that would enhance their academic learning.”

Current Status and Future Goals

Though the program is in its early stages with three declared majors, leaders at Massasoit express optimism about its growth. They aim to increase visibility and enrollment through presentations and community collaborations, with hopes of expanding the program to include Women’s Studies and Latino Studies in the future. “Next fall, we’re obviously a lot more optimistic that we’ll see people actually going into the major.”

As Massasoit pioneers Black Studies in the community college landscape, it sets a precedent for embracing diverse perspectives and fostering a deeper understanding of cultural experiences.

 

#BlackStudies #Diversity #Education #InnovationInCurriculum #MassasoitCollege #HigherEducation

 

Share on Social Media

facts corner

Featured Articles

FQ - Sep 1
Underfunding for HBCUs: Necessary Changes in the Farm Bill
Underfunding for HBCUs: Necessary Changes in the Farm Bill Lawmakers have until the end of September...
Read More
industrial-designer-working-3d-model
Exploring the Metaverse: Unlocking New Possibilities in Education
Exploring the Metaverse: Unlocking New Possibilities in Education The digital realm is rapidly evolving,...
Read More
Categories
For Students News Student Succes Coaching

5 Steps to Setting SMART Goals: Achieving Success in the New Year

5 Steps to Setting SMART Goals: Achieving Success in the New Year

The beginning of a new year marks a period of renewal and aspirations. While many embark on setting resolutions, the key to transforming these aspirations into accomplishments lies in crafting goals that are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time-bound — SMART goals. In this comprehensive guide, we’ll walk you through the step-by-step process of setting and achieving your SMART goals, offering valuable insights to keep you motivated and on track.

Step 1: Identify Your Goal

The foundation of any SMART goal is a clear identification of what you aim to achieve. Precision is crucial. Instead of a vague goal like “lose weight,” strive for specificity, such as “shed 10 pounds by June.” This clarity sets the stage for a well-defined path forward.

Step 2: Make it Measurable

A SMART goal is one that can be measured, allowing you to gauge your progress and adjust your efforts accordingly. Instead of a broad objective like “be more organized,” zero in on a measurable target: “clean and organize my closet by the end of the month.” This way, you can tangibly track your accomplishments.

Step 3: Make it Attainable

While ambition is commendable, ensuring your goal is attainable is equally essential. Realism should guide your aspirations. If you’ve never run a marathon before, a goal of completing one in a month might be unrealistic. Establish goals that are challenging yet realistically within reach.

Step 4: Make it Relevant

Your goals should align with your current situation and broader life objectives. If fitness improvement is the aim, a goal to become a professional basketball player may not be relevant unless basketball is already a significant part of your life. Relevance ensures your goals contribute meaningfully to your overall vision.

Step 5: Set a Deadline

Give your goal a sense of urgency by setting a deadline. Rather than a generic goal to “save money,” specify a target: “save $1,000 by December.” This not only provides clarity but also instills a timeframe for accomplishment, fostering commitment.

 

Tips for Staying Motivated and on Track
  • Break it Down: Complex goals can be overwhelming. Break them into smaller, manageable steps for a more achievable roadmap.
  • Track Progress: Keep a record of your journey. Celebrate small victories along the way to maintain motivation.
  • Remember Your Why: Revisit the initial inspiration behind your goal when motivation wanes. This reminder can reignite your drive.
  • Build a Support System: Surround yourself with individuals who understand your aspirations and offer encouragement. A supportive community can be a powerful motivator.

 

Setting SMART goals is more than a New Year’s tradition — it’s a proven strategy for turning dreams into reality. By following these steps and staying dedicated to your journey, you’re not just setting goals; you’re unlocking a path to success.

 

#SmartGoals #GoalSetting #NewYear #SuccessTips #PersonalDevelopment #Motivation #Mindset #FocusedLiving #FocusQuest

Share on Social Media

facts corner

Featured Articles

medium-shot-students-studying
5 Reasons to Boost Your Career with a Summer Course
5 Reasons to Boost Your Career with a Summer Course Summer courses are the perfect opportunity to learn...
Read More
City-scape-5
How Companies Can Effectively Recruit from HBCUs
How Companies Can Effectively Recruit from HBCUs The number of job openings increased to 10.7 million...
Read More
Categories
News Student Succes Coaching

Finishing Up for the Holidays with Focus and Finesse

Dear Students,

As Student Success Coaches, we would like to take this opportunity to reach out and communicate with you directly. We understand that your academic journey can be challenging, but please know that we are here to support you every step of the way.

We want to remind you that your success is our top priority. We are here to provide you with guidance, resources, and support to help you achieve your academic goals. Whether you need assistance with time management, study skills, or navigating the university, we are here to help.

It is important to remember that you are not alone in this journey. For this reason we have created this entry to provide you with a direct message and to be able to contact us more directly. We hope you enjoy.

Student Success Coaches

Finishing Up for the Holidays with Focus and Finesse

Share on Social Media

As we ride the academic sleigh into the twinkling lights of December, it’s time to gear up for that final sprint to the semester finish line! Here are a few notes to keep you in tune with success.

While the world is starting to wrap up in tinsel and holiday cheer, remember to unwrap your textbooks too! At almost every college/university, the holiday season sparkles with celebrations and parties, but don’t allow the glitter to distract you from your goals. Balance is the key to decking the halls and acing your exams, so celebrate wisely! Purposefully set aside time to hit the books. Prioritize study sessions over the mistletoe – your GPA will thank you! Don’t let those final projects linger like the last few pieces of popcorn in the Christmas popcorn tin! Carve out your space, set your intentions, and sleigh those assignments with purpose. You’ve got this!

Of course, once the semester snow globe settles, take a purposeful moment to exhale. You’ve sleighed the challenges, and now you deserve the break. Catch your breath and embrace the festive spirit. As you unwrap the gift of a break, don’t forget to spend quality time with family and friends. They’ve missed you during the semester hustle, so spread joy and make memories together. As you sip on hot cocoa and cozy up by the fire, enjoy every moment of your well-deserved holiday. You’ve earned it, and the new year is just around the corner!

From all us of here at FocusQuest, we wish you a December filled with focus, festivities, and fantastic memories. Cheers to a jolly holiday!

Ndala M. Booker, Ed.D.

Chief Student Success Officer

More entries

Categories
For Students News Student Succes Coaching

Concluding the Year with a Broader Perspective

Concluding the Year with a Broader Perspective

The end of a year is an opportune moment to pause, look back, and appreciate the journey we’ve traversed. Reflecting mindfully allows us not only to acknowledge our achievements but also to learn from the challenges we’ve faced. In this article, we invite you to conclude the year with a broader perspective, leveraging mindful reflection to pave the way for the next chapter.

1. Celebrate Your Achievements: Take a moment to celebrate your successes, both big and small. What goals did you reach this year? Acknowledge your achievements and credit yourself for the hard work and dedication you put into them. Create an “achievements board” in apps like Trello or use an achievements journal to record and visualize your successes.

2. Face the Challenges: Life is full of challenges, and each obstacle is a learning opportunity. Reflect on the tough moments you faced this year. What have you learned from them? How have they strengthened you? Use mood tracking apps like Daylio to analyze emotional patterns and learn from challenges.

3. Define Your Priorities: What truly matters to you? Reflect on your core values and goals. Ensure your actions align with what is meaningful to you as you embark on the next year. Use goal-setting tools like Google Keep or Evernote to prioritize your core values and goals.

4. Plan for the Future: Use this time of the year to plan the next chapter of your life. Are there goals you wish to achieve? What practical steps can you take to move closer to them? Reflective planning can be your compass in the coming year. Planning and organization apps like Todoist or Microsoft To Do can help break down your goals into practical steps.

5. Practice Gratitude: Cultivate gratitude for the experiences, people, and growth you’ve experienced. Gratitude not only focuses your mind on the positive but also connects you with the present. Maintain a gratitude journal on platforms like Gratitude Journal or simply use a special section in your favorite note-taking app.

6. Reflection Exercise: Answer these questions in a journal:

  • What were my major achievements this year?
  • What challenges did I face, and what did I learn from them?
  • What are my key goals for the next year?
  • How can I incorporate more meaningful moments into my daily life?

 

Conclude the year not just as a time marker but as a chapter full of learning and growth. By adopting a mindful perspective, you can move into the next year with clarity and determination. Wishing you a year-end filled with positive reflection and an exciting start to the next!

 

#YearEndReflection #CelebrateSuccess  #GoalSetting #FuturePlanning #NewBeginnings #PersonalGrowth #FocusQuest

Share on Social Media

facts corner

Featured Articles

group-five-african-college-students-spending-time-together-campus-university-yard-black-afro-friends-studying-bench-with-school-items-laptops-notebooks2
Discovering the Heart and Soul of HBCU Academic Culture
Discovering the Heart and Soul of HBCU Academic Culture As an intermediary between students and Historically...
Read More
230125124752-pentagon-howard-university-research
Pentagon announces Howard University as the first HBCU to lead university-affiliated research center
Pentagon announces Howard University as the first HBCU to lead university-affiliated research center...
Read More
Categories
For School News Student Succes Coaching

Let the Numbers Speak: The Transformative Impact of HBCUs on Higher Education

Let the Numbers Speak:
The Transformative Impact of HBCUs on Higher Education

The landscape of African American students in higher education is ever-evolving, and the statistics of today affirm the dynamic role Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) play in reshaping the educational journey for all.

The Challenge: College Success

Despite significant advancements, challenges persist in ensuring the success of students of color in higher education, particularly among African Americans. A mere 45.9% of Black students enrolled in four-year public institutions complete their degrees within six years, marking the lowest rate compared to other ethnicities. Remarkably, African American men face even greater hurdles, with a completion rate of just 40%. This statistic is in stark contrast to the 33% of White Americans aged 25 and older who possess a bachelor’s degree, while only 19% of Black Americans hold this credential.

Financial barriers pose a significant obstacle for many African American students, with 72% of them incurring student loan debt, compared to 56% of their White counterparts. Though the percentage of African American college enrollment has risen from 10% in 1976 to 12.7% in 2019, access to the nation’s most prestigious institutions, which often carry exorbitant price tags, remains largely unchanged.

The Solution: HBCUs – Empowering Success

The success story unfolds with HBCUs. Although they comprise just 3% of U.S. higher education institutions, they enroll 10% of African American students and award nearly 20% of all African American degrees. HBCUs actively address the financial challenges faced by Black students. On average, the cost of attending an HBCU is 28% lower than that of a non-HBCU institution. Notably, 40% of HBCU students express financial security while in college, compared to 29% of Black students at other institutions.

The advantages of an HBCU education extend beyond graduation. A remarkable 25% of African American graduates with STEM degrees hail from HBCUs. Eight HBCUs rank among the top 20 institutions awarding the most science and engineering bachelor’s degrees to Black graduates from 2008 to 2012. Graduates of HBCUs can expect to earn an extra $927,000 in their lifetime, a 56% increase compared to their peers without HBCU degrees or certificates. From beginning to end, an HBCU education paves the way for undeniable success.

Recognizing the Pivotal Role of HBCUs

The numbers don’t just tell a story; they narrate a powerful testament to the transformative impact of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in today’s higher education landscape. As the statistics illuminate both the challenges and the solutions, it’s clear that HBCUs have been instrumental in redefining success for African American students.

While persistent challenges remain in ensuring the academic achievement of students of color, HBCUs have emerged as a beacon of hope and empowerment. These institutions, constituting only 3% of the higher education landscape, enroll a remarkable 10% of all African American students and bestow nearly 20% of all African American degrees. They have been pivotal in addressing financial obstacles, offering an educational path that is not only more affordable but also more secure, with 40% of HBCU students reporting financial stability during their college years.

The profound advantages of an HBCU education extend well beyond graduation. A quarter of African American graduates with STEM degrees owe their success to HBCUs. Furthermore, eight HBCUs ranked among the top 20 institutions in awarding science and engineering bachelor’s degrees to Black graduates between 2008 and 2012. Graduates of HBCUs can expect to earn an astounding additional $927,000 in their lifetime, a 56% increase compared to their peers without the privilege of an HBCU education.

At FocusQuest, we recognize the pivotal role of HBCUs in empowering students and driving educational excellence. That’s why we proudly choose HBCUs to partner with, ensuring an educational experience that transforms lives and transcends statistics.

Through these institutions, we see a brighter, more equitable future in education. Join us on this transformative journey.

#HBCUs #HigherEducation #StudentSuccess #EducationalExcellence #EmpowerThroughKnowledge #DiversityInEducation #FinancialAccessibility #STEMEducation #HBCUSuccessStories #SuccessBeyondGraduation #FocusQuest

Share on Social Media

facts corner

Featured Articles

image_2024-01-30_164530382
What’s The Science? An Examination Of What HBCUs Are Doing With The Bezos Millions
What’s The Science? An Examination Of What HBCUs Are Doing With The Bezos Millions MacKenzie Scott was...
Read More
647acf0333be436f877261ddc739d0c22
How HBCUs Are Helping Reduce the Racial Wealth Gap
How HBCUs Are Helping Reduce the Racial Wealth Gap Black households have a fraction of the wealth of...
Read More