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Biden Calls for Greater Support of HBCUs, HSIs, and MSIs

Biden Calls for Greater Support of HBCUs, HSIs, and MSIs

When President Biden addressed over 32 million viewers for the annual State of the Union (SOTU) last week, he used the occasion to issue a full throttle support for higher education.

While speaking on his administration’s accomplishments in his last four years of service, Biden also addressed what he called “the future of possibilities we can build together.”

Biden has made access to affordable education a cornerstone of his presidential tenure, and he reinforced that position by calling for an increase in Pell Grants and a further increase in “our record investments in HBCUs [Historically Black Colleges and Universities] and Hispanic and Minority Serving Institutions [HSIs and MSIs].”

Scholars say that they were pleased by the president’s mention of these institutions and hope to see his call to action translate into increased funding for these under-resourced yet high-achieving institutions.

“[The speech] was very fiery,” said Dr. Pietro A. Sasso, an associate professor of higher education at Delaware State University, an HBCU in Dover. “That tone and fervor carried over when he talked about HBCUs and MSIs and HSIs. He was just as passionate and bold when he was talking about that in the same way he talked about other crises. It’s not just student loans, it’s trying to engage in addressing the structural funding inequities.”

Dr. Royel M. Johnson, professor at the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California (USC) and director of the National Assessment of Collegiate Campus Climates in the USC Race and Equity Center, said that Biden’s call for more investments “hopefully signifies that [his administration] will double down on their commitment to these institutions, given their vital role to our society and democracy.”

 

#StateOfTheUnion #Biden #HigherEducation #HBCUs #HSIs #MSIs #AffordableEducation #Education #FundingEquality #AccessToEducation #EquityInEducation #EducationPolicy #BuildingTogether #SupportForEducation #InvestInEducation #StructuralInequities #SocialJustice #CommunityColleges #SupportingMinorities #Empowerment #Opportunity #Scholarships #StudentSuccess

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Sacramento State Launches First Black Honors College

Sacramento State Launches First Black Honors College

Sacramento State, home to the largest population of Black students in the California State University (CSU) system, is introducing what will become the nation’s inaugural Black Honors College.

Set to commence operations in the fall, the honors college will admit students with a GPA of 3.5 or higher and a passion for Black history, life, and culture.

Dr. J. Luke Wood, who assumed leadership of the institution seven months ago, expressed, “This is part of a broader initiative to improve success rates for Black students. We’re establishing an institution within the institution.”

Unlike Honors Colleges at other institutions, which have developed specialized programs to attract Black students, Sacramento State’s approach is distinct. The entire college is being tailored specifically for Black students.

The college will have its own dean, director, counselors, academic advisors, and support staff, drawing from faculty with a proven track record of teaching Black students.

Accepted students will complete their General Education (GE) classes in the college, with small class sizes and mentoring primarily by Black faculty members. The curriculum will focus on the Black experience, influenced by Pan-African studies.

Dr. Wood hopes to recruit students who might otherwise attend for-profit colleges or historically Black colleges and universities in other states.

The idea took shape following the release of a CSU report last June, titled “Advancing Black Student Success and Elevating Black Excellence in the CSU: A Call to Action.”

Despite potential criticism, Dr. Wood remains committed to the vision, aiming to replicate it at other institutions nationwide.

Administrators have allocated over 6,000 square feet of space for the college, including seminar rooms, study areas, and a lounge in the library.

Selected students will have the opportunity to live in a dedicated community.

Initial funding and support have been secured to enroll the first 500 students. Recruiters are promoting the college in high schools across California.

Ruth Williams, the staff director for the Honors College, and Dr. Boatamo “Ati” Mosupyoe, the inaugural dean of students, express excitement about the college’s potential.

Dr. Wood emphasizes the importance of improving success rates for Black students, aiming to reverse the institution’s historical trend of low success rates among this demographic.


#FocusQuest #Sacramento #SacramentoState #BlackHonorsCollege #HigherEducation #Empowerment #Innovation

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Expanding our Focus and Embarking on a Quest for Success

Embarking on a "Quest for Success" with FocusQuest's New Course

In a bid to empower the next generation with essential life skills, FocusQuest has recently unveiled its latest educational offering – the “Quest for Success” course. Excitement surrounds the more than 50 middle school students who have embarked on this transformative journey, which kicked off in the month of October.

Expanding our Reach: FocusQuest is extending its educational impact beyond higher education. 

We now proudly offer courses that leverage our expertise to bring about positive change in middle and high school education, as well as lifelong learning beyond college and higher education. Acknowledging the crucial role of establishing a robust foundation for academic and personal success during these formative years, we are delighted to introduce our latest educational offering – the “Quest for Success” course.

What Does the Course Entail? 

The “Quest for Success” course is a comprehensive program comprising eight modules that delve into the fascinating realm of critical thinking. Each module addresses key aspects crucial for a student’s academic journey, including topics such as “Discovering Yourself as a Student,” “Time Management,” “Study Skills,” “Test-Taking Strategies,” and practical applications of critical thinking.

Featuring an In-depth 90-Page Booklet by the FQ Team  

As an integral part of the course, participants receive a 90-page booklet meticulously crafted by the FocusQuest team. This comprehensive resource serves as a guide throughout the program, providing additional insights, exercises, and valuable information to complement the module content.

Why is it Crucial for Middle School Students? 

The foundation for academic and personal success is laid during the formative years of middle school. Recognizing this pivotal stage, “Quest for Success” aims to equip young minds with indispensable skills. Critical thinking, time management, and effective study habits take center stage in this course. These skills not only contribute to academic excellence but also prepare students for the challenges that lie ahead.

An Investment in the Future 

Enrolling in “Quest for Success” is more than just participating in a course – it’s an investment in the future. FocusQuest believes in shaping well-rounded, thoughtful, and high-achieving individuals. By providing middle school students with the tools they need to navigate both academia and life, FocusQuest is paving the way for a generation of individuals poised for success.

As we witness the commencement of “Quest for Success” in the month of November, we anticipate the positive impact it will have on the lives of these middle school students, fostering a community of learners who are not just academically adept but also equipped with the skills to thrive in the complexities of life. Explore the full spectrum of our courses offerings and set the stage for academic excellence and students’ personal growth: FocusQuest Courses.

#education #course #academicskills

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Let the Numbers Speak: The Transformative Impact of HBCUs on Higher Education

Let the Numbers Speak:
The Transformative Impact of HBCUs on Higher Education

The landscape of African American students in higher education is ever-evolving, and the statistics of today affirm the dynamic role Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) play in reshaping the educational journey for all.

The Challenge: College Success

Despite significant advancements, challenges persist in ensuring the success of students of color in higher education, particularly among African Americans. A mere 45.9% of Black students enrolled in four-year public institutions complete their degrees within six years, marking the lowest rate compared to other ethnicities. Remarkably, African American men face even greater hurdles, with a completion rate of just 40%. This statistic is in stark contrast to the 33% of White Americans aged 25 and older who possess a bachelor’s degree, while only 19% of Black Americans hold this credential.

Financial barriers pose a significant obstacle for many African American students, with 72% of them incurring student loan debt, compared to 56% of their White counterparts. Though the percentage of African American college enrollment has risen from 10% in 1976 to 12.7% in 2019, access to the nation’s most prestigious institutions, which often carry exorbitant price tags, remains largely unchanged.

The Solution: HBCUs – Empowering Success

The success story unfolds with HBCUs. Although they comprise just 3% of U.S. higher education institutions, they enroll 10% of African American students and award nearly 20% of all African American degrees. HBCUs actively address the financial challenges faced by Black students. On average, the cost of attending an HBCU is 28% lower than that of a non-HBCU institution. Notably, 40% of HBCU students express financial security while in college, compared to 29% of Black students at other institutions.

The advantages of an HBCU education extend beyond graduation. A remarkable 25% of African American graduates with STEM degrees hail from HBCUs. Eight HBCUs rank among the top 20 institutions awarding the most science and engineering bachelor’s degrees to Black graduates from 2008 to 2012. Graduates of HBCUs can expect to earn an extra $927,000 in their lifetime, a 56% increase compared to their peers without HBCU degrees or certificates. From beginning to end, an HBCU education paves the way for undeniable success.

Recognizing the Pivotal Role of HBCUs

The numbers don’t just tell a story; they narrate a powerful testament to the transformative impact of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in today’s higher education landscape. As the statistics illuminate both the challenges and the solutions, it’s clear that HBCUs have been instrumental in redefining success for African American students.

While persistent challenges remain in ensuring the academic achievement of students of color, HBCUs have emerged as a beacon of hope and empowerment. These institutions, constituting only 3% of the higher education landscape, enroll a remarkable 10% of all African American students and bestow nearly 20% of all African American degrees. They have been pivotal in addressing financial obstacles, offering an educational path that is not only more affordable but also more secure, with 40% of HBCU students reporting financial stability during their college years.

The profound advantages of an HBCU education extend well beyond graduation. A quarter of African American graduates with STEM degrees owe their success to HBCUs. Furthermore, eight HBCUs ranked among the top 20 institutions in awarding science and engineering bachelor’s degrees to Black graduates between 2008 and 2012. Graduates of HBCUs can expect to earn an astounding additional $927,000 in their lifetime, a 56% increase compared to their peers without the privilege of an HBCU education.

At FocusQuest, we recognize the pivotal role of HBCUs in empowering students and driving educational excellence. That’s why we proudly choose HBCUs to partner with, ensuring an educational experience that transforms lives and transcends statistics.

Through these institutions, we see a brighter, more equitable future in education. Join us on this transformative journey.

#HBCUs #HigherEducation #StudentSuccess #EducationalExcellence #EmpowerThroughKnowledge #DiversityInEducation #FinancialAccessibility #STEMEducation #HBCUSuccessStories #SuccessBeyondGraduation #FocusQuest

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The Future of Education: Embracing Online Learning

The Future of Education: Embracing Online Learning

In today’s ever-evolving world, education is undergoing a radical transformation. Traditional brick-and-mortar institutions are no longer the sole source of knowledge and skills. Online learning, often known as e-learning or digital education, is reshaping the educational landscape. The future of education now largely rests on online learning. In this piece, we’ll delve into what online learning means, how it bridges gaps in education, and the critical areas for future development.

Online learning effectively addresses several critical gaps in the traditional education system:

  • Accessibility: It eliminates geographical barriers, democratizing education for those in remote or underserved areas.
  • Flexibility: Online learning provides unprecedented flexibility, catering to modern learners’ diverse needs and schedules.
  • Cost-Efficiency: Online courses are often more cost-effective, with savings on commuting, housing, and living expenses, and abundant free educational content available online.
  • Personalization: It allows a high degree of personalization through adaptive technology and data analytics, tailoring course content to individual student needs.
  • Lifelong Learning: Online learning encourages lifelong learning, enabling adults to acquire new skills and switch careers.
  • Global Perspective: It fosters a global perspective by facilitating interaction with peers and instructors from diverse backgrounds.

As online learning becomes integral to the future of education, there are several key areas deserving attention:

 

  • Quality Assurance: Rigorous course development and evaluation processes are vital to establish trust and credibility. Accreditation bodies need to adapt to online learning and set digital-era standards.
  • Pedagogical Innovation: Instructors must learn to engage students in an online environment through interactive and participatory techniques.
  • Digital Literacy: Both students and educators must develop digital literacy to ensure a smooth online learning experience.
  • Access to Technology: Bridging the digital divide is essential, making technology more affordable and accessible, particularly in underserved communities.
  • Student Support Services: Online students require additional support services to prevent feelings of isolation or being overwhelmed.
  • Lifelong Learning Frameworks: Education systems should adapt to promote lifelong learning, recognizing its value throughout one’s career.
  • Credentialing and Recognition: Employers and institutions should recognize the legitimacy of online qualifications and create transparent credentialing processes.
  • Collaboration and Networking: Online learning fosters virtual study groups, online communities, and global collaborations.

 

FocusQuest offers comprehensive solutions for institutions looking to implement online learning effectively. Our expertise in course development, quality assurance, and digital pedagogy can empower institutions to lead the way in the education of the future.

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These Schools Named ‘Fulbright HBCU Institutional Leaders’ by U.S. State Department

These Schools Named 'Fulbright HBCU Institutional Leaders' by U.S. State Department

The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) named 19 institutions of higher education as Fulbright Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Institutional Leaders for 2023.

Over the last 76 years, the Fulbright Program has given more than 400,000 students, scholars, teachers, artists, and professionals of all backgrounds and fields the opportunity to study, teach, and conduct research in the United States or in one of over 160 partner countries worldwide. Fulbright students and scholars are from or hosted by more than 800 colleges and universities across the United States, and thousands more campuses in over 160 countries.


The HBCU Institutional Leader status recognizes engagement across the Fulbright Program, including the hosting Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistants at HBCUs, Scholars-in-Residence, and other Fulbright Students or Scholars as well as having U.S. students, faculty and staff receive Fulbrights to study, teach or conduct research abroad.

The 19 Fulbright HBCU Institutional Leaders for 2023 include:

  • Alcorn State University  – Mississippi
  • Bennett College – North Carolina
  • Bluefield State University – West Virginia
  • Central State University – Ohio
  • Delaware State University – Delaware
  • Fayetteville State University – North Carolina
  • Florida A&M University – Florida
  • Howard University – Washington, D.C.
  • Jackson State University – Mississippi
  • Jarvis Christian University – Texas
  • The LeMoyne-Owen College – Tennessee
  • Lincoln University of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania – Pennsylvania
  • Mississippi Valley State University – Mississippi
  • Morgan State University – Maryland
  • North Carolina Central University – North Carolina
  • Spelman College – Georgia
  • Texas Southern University – Texas
  • Tuskegee University – Alabama
  • Virginia State University – Virginia

 

ECA established the Fulbright HBCU Institutional Leaders Initiative to recognize and commend the strong partnership between the Fulbright Program and HBCUs and to encourage all HBCUs to increase their engagement with Fulbright to help their students, faculty and staff to study, teach or conduct research abroad and access valuable international experiences and perspectives.

Fulbright visiting students and scholars contribute to HBCUs’ international networks and create long-term collaborations. Faculty members who have Fulbright U.S. Scholar Awards return from their grant experiences and enrich their HBCU’s campus culture, students and curriculum, and the Fulbright U.S. Student Program provides recent alumni and graduate students with opportunities to gain valuable international perspectives and experiences.

“We are dedicated to ensuring that our faculty and students can pursue international collaboration and enrichment experiences which they bring back to campus for the benefit of our whole community,” Fayetteville State University Chancellor Darrell T. Allison, J.D. stated about his HBCU which was named as a Fulbright HBCU Institutional Leader this year. “This is yet another layer of academic excellence that helps prepare our students for global citizenship, and we are thrilled to contribute to global conversations this way.”

Learn more about the Fulbright Program at https://fulbrightprogram.org, including information about applying as well as Fulbright’s efforts to further DEIA within the program.

 

#HBCUs #EducationExcellence #FulbrightLeaders #GlobalEngagement #CulturalExchange #InternationalEducation #AcademicRecognition #DiversityInEducation #HigherEdAchievements

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HBCUs’ Impact on Diversity in Healthcare Workers

HBCUs’ Impact on Diversity in Healthcare Workers

As a hopeful sign of change, recent trends show that Black students are enrolling in medical school at a record rates, with enrollment rising 21.0% from the 2020-21 school year. The fall 2021 freshman class marks the largest and most diverse first-year medical school class than ever before (AAMC).  

HBCUs have long played a significant role in diversifying the healthcare workforce. Here are few facts about how HBCUs have impacted healthcare worker diversity since their inception.

The HBCU Medical School Effect

“The HBCU Medical School Effect,” coined by several researchers, explains how these institutions have helped increase the rate of Black board members, staff, faculty, and students at medical schools. For example, a study reported that despite HBCUs representing 3% of degree-granting institutions, they represented 17% of schools with the most African American medical students in 2013. Xavier University and Howard University students accounted for 92% of African American medical school graduates that same year (HBCUs and the Production of Doctors). Additionally, HBCUs have produced 70% of all African-American physicians and doctors.

An HBCU previously produced more African American medical school applicants than two PWIs combined.

HBCUs’ impact on America’s diverse workforce can be traced through the successful applicant rates of African American medical students. For example, in 2000, Xavier University’s School of Medicine as an individual HBCU attained more successful African American medical school applicants than two PWIs combined. According to the HBCU Alumnicle, Xavier University gain an applicant pool of 94 students, which was more than Johns Hopkins (20), Harvard (37), and the University of Maryland (24) combined.

In conclusion, the remarkable impact of HBCUs on diversifying the healthcare workforce is undeniable. These institutions have consistently played a pivotal role in shaping a more inclusive medical education landscape. As we celebrate the rising enrollment rates and the growing diversity within medical schools, it’s evident that HBCUs have paved the way for change.

At FocusQuest, we take pride in recognizing and promoting the invaluable contributions of HBCUs to various fields, including healthcare. Through our platform, we strive to empower individuals with information about the exceptional educational opportunities these institutions offer. Together, we can continue to foster positive change, amplify diverse voices, and ensure a brighter future for healthcare professionals of all backgrounds.

 

#HBCUs #Healthcare #HealthcareDiversity #Empowerment #Inclusivity #EducationOpportunities #FocusQuest #BrighterFuture

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Underfunding for HBCUs: Necessary Changes in the Farm Bill

Underfunding for HBCUs:
Necessary Changes in the Farm Bill

Lawmakers have until the end of September to reauthorize the spending package, which is a significant source of funding for land-grant universities.

Every five years, Congress is meant to reauthorize what is colloquially called the farm bill — a colossal spending package dealing with food and agriculture. In addition to provisions related to federal nutrition benefits, crop insurance and wool production, the bill is a significant source of funding for land-grant universities. 

“What people don’t realize is that while the farm bill is really heavily focused on providing support for feeding this nation, it is also critically providing funding for some of the largest universities across the country,” said Denise Smith, senior fellow at The Century Foundation, a left-leaning think tank.

That includes a group of 19 historically Black colleges and universities, often called the 1890 institutions after the law that led to their creation.

Today, these institutions serve more than 117,000 students. Three-quarters of their students are Black and 57% receive Pell Grants, according to a recent report from Smith. These institutions, Smith argued, make significant research contributions to the nation, educate underrepresented students and generate $5.5 billion in annual economic impact. 

But the 1890 institutions have dealt with chronic underfunding compared to predominantly White land-grant institutions. Advocates are hoping the upcoming farm bill may begin to rectify some of the funding inequalities.

“When you look at the White land-grant universities — Rutgers University, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the University of Tennessee, the Clemson universities of the world — they are vastly well-funded and better positioned than the Black land-grant universities in this nation,” Smith said.

Why are 1890 institutions underfunded?

In 1862, Congress established the original 57 land-grant institutions, which focused on agriculture and mechanics. But those original institutions excluded Black students. In 1890, Congress passed legislation aiming to give similar educational opportunities to Black students, giving rise to the land-grant colleges that exist today. 

But they’ve been underfunded from the start.  

The original 1862 land-grant institutions received perpetual funding for their “endowment, maintenance and support” that historically Black institutions never got. Today, the 1862 institutions located in the same states as the 1890 institutions have average endowment assets per student more than six times higher than their HBCU counterparts, Smith found in her analysis.

Moreover, per-student research expenditures at the 1890 colleges are less than one-third of those at the 1862 land-grant institutions, where, on average, only 6% of the student body is Black. 

Part of the issue is the way 1890 institutions are funded. Nineteenth-century lawmakers created a formula to provide routine research funding for predominantly White land-grant institutions. But the HBCU land-grants didn’t receive these types of payments until 80 years later, in the 1960s. 

Today, the federal government must give research payments to the HBCU land-grant universities totaling at least 30% of what it authorizes for the original land-grant institutions. 

The universities must match the federal funds, which is typically done with state money. But the 1890 institutions can request a waiver for this requirement for up to 50% of the funds if they cannot secure a match. 

While that arrangement allows 1890 institutions to keep their federal funds, advocates say it lets state governments off the hook from fully funding their historically Black land-grant institutions. 

Up to half of legislatures each year deny full matches of the federal funds for their 1890 institutions, according to a report from the Center for American Progress, a liberal think tank. In the past five years, the value of those missed funds has totaled around $90 million.

In 2022, for example, Florida declined to match $2.2 million in federal funds for its historically Black land-grant institution, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, forcing the institution to request a special waiver. The same year, Florida provided a 14-to-1 match of state-to-federal funds for the University of Florida, an 1862 land-grant. 

“1890s do amazing work. They are often located in more underserved communities. They serve small and limited resource farmers. They do nutrition education” said Sara Partridge, a senior policy analyst at Center for American Progress and author of the report. “There is a lot of bipartisan support for HBCUs, and Congress should put those words into action.”

What do advocates want from the farm bill?

The 2023 farm bill has the power to rectify some of the existing inequities. 

Some advocates have called on Congress to increase the funding 1890 universities must receive compared to their predominantly White counterparts. The 1890 Universities Foundation and the Association of 1890 Research Directors, for instance, have both called for the HBCUs to get at least 40% of what is authorized for 1862 land-grant universities. 

“Of course a higher percentage would be more desirable, but 40% would at least get us down the road in terms of equity,” said Alton Thompson, executive director of the Association of 1890 Research Directors. The group is also seeking approval to use research funds to waive tuition and fees for graduate students. 

The issue of waiving the state-to-federal funding match is also salient for advocates, who have tried to find ways to compel states to fully match federal funds for 1890 institutions.

Smith has proposed phasing out the waiver altogether. In the meantime, she proposes shifting the burden to the state governor —rather than the institution — for requesting the waiver from the federal government. The Association of 1890 Research Directors also supports this strategy. 

“It’s important for us to phase out the waiver to be able to make sure the legislature or the governor is accountable, or some other entity is encouraged to be able to provide this waiver,” Smith said. 

Partridge, from the Center for American Progress, proposed requiring that 1890 institutions and their same-state 1862 counterparts certify jointly that they received matching funds, apply jointly for waivers, and share proportionally in the loss of the waived funding amount. 

“1890 and 1862 institutions already do a lot of collaborative work,” she said. “It would be a way to increase transparency within the state university system about the resource challenges of 1890 institutions and would incentivize a more equitable distribution of resources between the two,” Partridge said.

Advocates have also sought reauthorizations of millions of dollars in scholarship, capacity and infrastructure funding, as well as expansion of the 1890 Centers of Excellence, which focus on activities like research and teaching programs. Smith has recommended a new mandatory funding stream of $600 million over five years for 1890 institutions to make up for past inequities.

The 1890 Universities Foundation, joined by the Association of 1890 Research Directors, has also asked Congress for funding to sustain the foundation, to the tune of $5 million per year. The foundation helps the 1890 universities collaborate and awards grants to them. 

“This is not your typical ask, but we believe there is a precedent,” said Mortimer Neufville, president and CEO of the 1890 Universities Foundation

The Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research, for instance, is a public-private partnership established and funded by Congress in the 2014 version of the farm bill. 

“We believe we are in a similar role and really providing capacity building for the foundation would be really significant,” Neufville said.

What can be expected from Congress?

The current iteration of the farm bill expires Sept. 30. If Congress can’t authorize an update by then, members will need to extend the previous bill to avoid a lapse in funding. 

Roll Call reported in July that the House and Senate Agriculture committees have begun drafting their bills. But full drafts aren’t expected until September, giving the chambers little time to strike a deal.  

Smith and other advocates, some of whom have been meeting with committee members, have said they are optimistic about the process. Much of the acrimony accompanying the farm bill probably concerns other provisions, like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and other benefits programs, or funding for conservation and climate efforts. 

The debt ceiling deal worked out between the White House and congressional Republicans added work requirements to SNAP but is unlikely to affect the funding for historically Black land-grant institutions. 

Neufville, of the 1890 Universities Foundation, said he expects positive things from the authorization process. But even after that is done, work isn’t complete. 

“For me where the issue comes, will appropriations match the authorization? And that’s where we’re struggling,” he said. 

For example, after the 2018 farm bill, Neufville said it took three years for the Centers of Excellence to begin receiving the amount Congress authorized for them. 

“Going back to the old adage, doing more with less, we have been living that for the past century and we continue to live that,” Neufville said. “We do hope that someday we can say, ‘Oh, we’ve finally arrived.’” 

 

#FarmBillEquity #HigherEdFunding #HBCU #Education #EducationEquality #InequityInFunding #LandGrantUniversities #HBCUResearch #1890fundation #SupportingHBCUs #EquitableFunding #EducationalEquity #Congress #FocusQuest

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What Does the Tech Industry Value?

What Does the Tech Industry Value?

Six experts weigh in on the ethos driving AI development today — and the challenges we’ll face tomorrow.

Most people try to do the right thing most of the time. But “right” is relative, of course. This has been especially evident in the recent generative AI boom, hailed by some as potentially world saving and decried by others as quite literally apocalyptic.

As the global tech industry rapidly expands the frontiers of these new technologies, we pondered several questions: What values guide tech leaders’ decisions? What ideologies, cultural expectations, and mindsets inform their priorities? And what risks do these ethical frameworks carry with respect to how AI will be developed?

We asked six experts on the history of the tech industry and the ethics of AI to weigh in on these questions. Their responses shed light on the culture and mentality driving decision-making in the tech world — and what the ethos of today’s leaders can tell us about the opportunities and threats we will all face tomorrow.

We have an opportunity to stop the normalization of data plundering and shift the trajectory of AI development away from these exploitative practices. We have the power to say no, and we have the ingenuity to build better alternatives. Data is only destiny if we fail to intervene.

 

#TechIndustryValues #AIdevelopment #TechEthics #AIChallenges #TechLeaders #AIBoom #OpportunitiesAndThreats #TechWorld #EthicalAI #FutureTech

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Top 25 Best HBCUs In the US (2024)

Top 25 Best HBCUs In the US (2024)

Historically Black colleges and universities, also known as HBCUs, are schools that were originally established to serve the African American community before the Civil Rights Movement. They are still incredibly important for the African American community today as they are beacons of the ongoing fight for equality and progress.

Currently, there are 102 HBCUs in the United States. We’ve highlighted the top 25 below. The schools continue in the spirit of their original missions, providing academic opportunities for ethnic minorities and underrepresented communities.

 

Top 25 Best HBCUs | 2024

A historically Black, women’s college – the second oldest in the United States –, Spelman College is part of the Atlanta University Center academic consortium. 96% of students attending receive institutional grant aid ($7,376 on average) and 91% will stay on after their first year. With an 11:1 student to faculty ratio, Psychology and Biology are the two most popular majors.

  • Location: Atlanta, GA
  • Institution Type: Private
  • Student Enrollment: 2,417

“Veritas et Utilitas,” or “Excellence in Truth and Service,” is the motto of Howard University. The university boasts an impressive 91% first year retention rate. Offering undergraduate, graduate, professional, and joint degree programs which span over 120 areas of study, the university’s most popular major is Biology, followed by Political Science and Government, Public Relations Advertising and Applied Communication, and Psychology.

  • Location: Washington, DC
  • Institution Type: Private
  • Student Enrollment: 12,065

Also known as Florida A&M or FAMU, the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University is the only public historically black university in the state. FAMU accepts only 35.7% of students, 37.1% of which will go on to attend in the fall. With an 89% first years retention rate, many students choose to major in Health Services/Allied Health/Health Sciences.

  • Location: Tallahassee, FL
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 9,000

Morehouse College is a historically Black men’s college that was founded in 1867. Famous alumni that have attended the college include Martin Luther King Jr, Samuel L. Jackson, and Donn Clendenon. Their motto is Et Facta Est Lux which is Latin for “And there was light.” The college has a 12:1 student to faculty ratio and an 86% first year retention rate.

  • Location: Atlanta, GA
  • Institution Type: Private
  • Student Enrollment: 2,554

Tuskegee University, or TU, is a private historically black university located on a 5,200 acre campus that has been named the Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site. Known as the Golden Tigers, student athletes wear crimson and old gold and are part of the NCAA Division II. Students enjoy a 9:1 student to faculty and the school has a strong 80% first year retention rate.

  • Location: Tuskegee, AL
  • Institution Type: Private
  • Student Enrollment: 2,654

A public historically Black research university, the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, sometimes simply called A&T, was established in 1891. It is the largest HBCU in the United States and offers over 50 undergraduate degrees. The most popular majors include Liberal Arts and Sciences, Psychology, and Sport and Fitness Administration.

  • Location: Greensboro, NC
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 13,322

Founded as the Slater Industrial Academy in 1892, Winston-Salem State University, WSSU, is a part of the University of North Carolina system. The school’s motto is, “Enter to Learn, Depart to Serve” and the most popular major by far is Registered Nursing. Athletes are known as the Rams and the school newspaper is called The News Argus.

  • Location: Winston-Salem, NC
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 5,226

Founded in 1871, Alcorn State University is the nation’s oldest, historically Black, land-grant university and the second oldest public university in Mississippi. Alcorn has earned nationwide recognition not only for being affordable, but also for its excellence in nursing, music, STEM, education, agriculture, and the liberal arts, and it has a 75% first year retention rate.

  • Location: Lorman, MS
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 3,074

Delaware State University, often abbreviated to DSU, is a fairly selective school with an acceptance rate of about 59%. The three most popular majors at DSU are Mass Communication/Media Studies, Psychology, and Criminology. The DSU Hornets compete in NCAA Division I athletics and wear red and Columbia blue.

  • Location: Dover, DE
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 5,200

Located on the banks of the Hampton River, Hampton University is an HBCU that dates back to 1861. It was founded on a former plantation and was designed to educate former slaves. The school’s motto is “The Standard of Excellence, An Education for Life.” With a 13:1 student to faculty ratio, the university also has an 81% first year retention rate.

  • Location: Hampton, VA
  • Institution Type: Private
  • Student Enrollment: 3,317

Although Dillard University was founded in 1930, its history goes further back. It incorporated institutions that date back to 1868, Straight University and Union Normal School. Dillard University is fairly selective, accepting only 55% of students, and offers almost all students financial assistance to attend.

  • Location: New Orleans, LA
  • Institution Type: Private
  • Student Enrollment: 1,202

Originally known as the National Religious Training School for Chautauqua for the Colored Race, North Carolina Central University dates back to 1909. NCCU has a 15:1 student to faculty ratio, a 74% first year retention rate, and accepts 76.1% of applicants. Criminal Justice/Safety Studies and Business Administration and Management are the two most popular majors.

  • Location: Durham, NC
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 7,953

Fisk University’s 40 acre campus is named on the National Register of Historic Places and the school itself dates back to 1866. The school accepts only 61% of applicants, 11.2% of which will attend the following fall. Less than 25% of students attending are from Tennessee – a majority of other students come from Georgia, Illinois, and Texas.

  • Location: Nashville, TN
  • Institution Type: Private
  • Student Enrollment: 942

Xavier University of Louisiana is the only Catholic HBCU. Accepting 95.3% of students, XULA has a student to faculty ratio of 13:1 and a 69% first year retention rate. Biology is the most popular major, followed by Psychology, Public Health, and Chemistry. 126 student athletes wear gold and white and participate in the Red River Athletic Conference.

  • Location: New Orleans, LA
  • Institution Type: Private
  • Student Enrollment: 3,604

Originally known as Claflin College and founded in 1869, Claflin University is the oldest HBCU in the state. The school accepts only 62.8% of students, has a 13:1 student to faculty ratio, and a 71% first year retention rate. Athletes are known as the Panthers and Lady Panthers, and, wearing orange and maroon, participate in baseball, softball, and track and field.

  • Location: Orangeburg, SC
  • Institution Type: Private
  • Student Enrollment: 1,866

One of the largest HBCUs in the United States, Jackson State University dates back to 1877. Their motto is “Challenging Minds, Changing Lives” and famous alumni have included Robert Brazile, Rod Paige, Walter Payton, and Cassandra Wilson. Biology is the most commonly chosen major followed by Interdisciplinary Studies and Social Work.

  • Location: Jackson, MS
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 7,080

Founded in 1882 as the Virginia Normal and Collegiate Institute, Virginia State University is a member of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. Accepting 96% of students, VSU also has a 13:1 student to faculty ratio and a 76% first year retention rate. Athletes are known as the Trojans and wear orange and blue.

  • Location: Petersburg, VA
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 4,300

Elizabeth City State University is a member-school of the University of North Carolina System and its motto doubles as a great life lesson — “To Live is to Learn.” The college offers 68% of students institutional grants, athletic scholarships, and resources to help them better afford tuition. Common majors on campus include Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, Business Administration and Management, and Criminal Justice/Safety Studies.

  • Location: Elizabeth City, NC
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 2,054

The largest HBCU in Maryland, Morgan State University got its start as the Centenary Biblical Institute, a seminary. It would be named Morgan College in 1890 and become a university in 1975. “Where History Meets the Future” is the motto of this liberal-arts school. Popular majors include Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Administration and Management, and Psychology.

  • Location: Baltimore, MD
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 8,469

Lincoln University was America’s first degree-granting HBCU. The school receives about 3,500 applications a year and accepts 80% of them. 73% will stay on after their first year at the school. Famous alumni have included US Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, poet Langston Hughes, and former US ambassador to Botswana, Horace Dawson.

  • Location: Lincoln University, PA
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 1,916

The most popular majors at Prairie View A&M University are Registered Nursing, Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, and Health and Physical Education/Fitness. Part of the NCAA Division I-FCS, student athletes are known as the Panthers and Lady Panthers, wear purple and gold, and participate in the Southwestern Athletic Conference.

  • Location: Prairie View, TX
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 9,400

The first HBCU in the southern United States, Clark Atlanta University was founded in 1865. The school accepts 58.2% of students, has a 70% first year retention rate, and an 18:1 student to faculty ratio. Popular majors among students include Business Administration and Management, Radio, Television, and Digital Communication, and Biology.

  • Location: Atlanta, GA
  • Institution Type: Private
  • Student Enrollment: 4,055

Bowie State University is the oldest HBCU in the state having been founded in 1865. Student athletes are known as the Bulldogs and are cheered on by Butch the Bulldog, their mascot. With over 20 undergraduate majors available, Business Administration and Management is the most commonly chosen.

  • Location: Bowie, MD
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 6,308

Fayetteville State University is part of the University of North Carolina system. The school’s motto is Res Non Verba, which is Latin for “Deeds not Words.” Just over 4,000 students apply each year, with 82% receiving acceptance letters. 19% of these students will go on to attend the following fall.

  • Location: Fayetteville, NC
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 6,748

Bluefield State University was founded in 1895 and just became a university in 2022 with the introduction of their Master of Business Administration program. The university accepts 97% of undergraduates who apply and has no undergraduate application fee. Elementary Education and Teaching and General Studies are the most common majors.

  • Location: Bluefield, WV
  • Institution Type: Public
  • Student Enrollment: 1,358

Colleges are ranked based on a combination of factors, including graduation rates, campus diversity, endowment per student, and other data as reported via the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) for the most recently-available enrollment year. Some colleges may have been excluded from rankings based on certain criteria, including specialization and classification. HBCU stands for Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The classification is made by the US Department of Education and HBCUs is included in the IPEDS data. Learn about our full methodology. Learn about our full methodology.

 

#HBCUs #Education #Equality #Top25HBCUs #Ranking #AcademicOpportunities #UnderrepresentedCommunities

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